December 9, 2019

 The original Image of AD 1548 from the Codex Escalada. Note the skull in place of the angle's face. Mary is also looking straightforward and her chin is up. There may even be a crescent above her head. The crescent above Roman Queens heads on coins is solar as describ...

June 26, 2019


     A re-creation of the Roman Army signaling standard from the time of Emperor Tiberius. The details were taken from period coins of Marc Antony, Augustus and Tiberius. Note ancient warfare was colorful and not monochromatic from the movies. These standards were wor...

May 12, 2019

PLEASE SEE THE BELOW VIDEO FOR AN IN DEPTH ANALYSIS OF OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE.

March 27, 2019

     We can see the heavy influence of the Egyptian religion on Greco Roman thought. Remember Alexander the Great started thinking he was the Son of God after visiting the oracle in the deserts of Egypt. The above coin is from Ptolemy II who invited the Jews to Alexand...

March 15, 2019

More numismatic evidence of the Greco-Roman trade of opium in the Galilee. The above coin from Gadara was minted in 40-39 BC. Note Pompey rebuilt the city in 63 BC as a city of the Decapolis. The first coins show the above motif. The obverse has Tyche, a city god...

March 7, 2019


Simply put in ancient cultivation and even in modern fields, drought and sun exposure dry out the leaf and the serrations wither and disappear. Also when the leaves are picked, the edges curl in on themselves. The above coin is a Hemidrachm from Th...

February 24, 2019

This is a very difficult post for several reasons. Those of you familiar with the numismatic literature are aware up until recent modern times these coins were regarded as depicting an opium poppy between the two cornucopias on the reverse. Poppies and barley leaves ar...

February 9, 2019

     Pontius Pilate placed Roman symbols of "Augury" on his coins. The Romans would have priests interpret the actions of birds to determine the best course of action in state affairs. The health and welfare of the Roman Empire could be determined by observing bird...

January 21, 2019

     The above coin was minted in Rome between 65 to 59 BC. It is not hard to see the two stars may be indicative of the solar eclipses seen over the city between 63 and 61 BC. To the Roman population at the time the meaning was obvious and these solar eclipses were se...

January 20, 2019

     The above star on the reverse likely represents the annular solar eclipse of AD 49 which was directly over Antioch in Roman Syria. Claudius is on the obverse and this coin was minted in Antioch. Note the star changes to a star and crescent motif with partial solar...

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This project shows the meaning of the star within the crescent on Roman coins is likely symbolic for a solar eclipse. The star is a planet to the ancients and the crescent is the sun. The ram is an astrologic symbol for ancient Judea or the lands from Antioch to Egypt.

Please see the below link to, " The Evidence for Aries the Ram as the Astrological Sign of Judea, " by Michael R. Molnar

Clearly one sees a planetary body moving over the sun in this photo. This is the Antioch ram coin issued from Nero in 55-56 AD. From the T. Cartwright collection

Eclipse diagrams are taken from the NASA Website, "Canon of Solar Eclipses"

Acknowlegements, Eclipse Predictions by Fred Espenak, NASA/GSFC

Thanks to the Vcoins search engine website and the individual vendors for the photos as cited

2000 years ago the cross was a Roman symbol of death and terror. Jesus Christ transformed this symbol into a universal sign of God's love, hope and resurrection. Solar eclipse events are recorded in Roman mythology during the conception of Romulus and Remus by the war god Mars and during the foundation of the city of Rome. The solar eclipse to the Romans was a sign from their gods that war was upon the Earth. The solar eclipse symbol of the star/pellet within the crescent on Roman coins and legionary standards was also a sign of their god's approval of Roman domination over conquered lands. Fifteen hundred years later, the "Our Lady of Guadalupe" Icon was presented to the New World as an inverted Roman Legionary Standard. Jesus Christ changed these symbols of Roman domination and slavery into an everlasting sign of God's love and compassion.